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REVIEW: ADETISOLA ‘GIVES IT ALL’ IN 1001 SINGING SUCCESS SECRETS; IT IS ‘ENGAGING AND CONVERSATIONAL’

TITLE: 1001 SINGING SUCCESS SECRETS
AUTHOR: GBADE ADETISOLA
GENRE: SELF-HELP (NON-FICTION)
NO. OF PAGES: 128
PUBLISHER: WORDS RHYMES AND RHYTHMS LTD
YEAR OF PUBLICATION: 2019
ISBN: 978-978-967-586-9
REVIEWER:  EUGENE YAKUBU

In 1001 Singing Success Secrets, Adetisola offers a comprehensive guide to maximizing singers’ potentials, commercializing art and improving the voice. This piece has everything an artiste needs to know about music and singing. Interestingly, Adetisola offers factual and practical examples that will help any singer develop his career.

This book proves that music skills, the mother of all art, can be learned and sustained and it does so graphically by offering training sessions and to-do notes that if followed appropriately will surely develop the singer. For example, in this book, the reader learns that while water can improve the vocal cord, alcohol, and smoke destroy it.

The writer stresses that “even the greatest voice could turn worse drastically due to substance abuse” and “a singer’s voice is as sound as his/her health”. What makes these assertions interesting is that they are declared by someone who has had reasonable years of experience in singing and the music industry and who has researched on singing and music and their relationship with the world and the singer.

Even though some of the assertions made in the book are not empirical, it is easy to see that they are valid points raised. Thus the reader will do well to follow these processes and techniques that Adetisola believes will develop any singer.

The book is engaging and conversational. It is actually written like a lecture or seminar on singing delivered to readers. Thus, the reader is offered exercises that improve the voice, the diet that helps the voice, lifestyles that support a singer’s development and habits to cultivate in order to sufficiently explore one’s talent.

It went as far as preparing readers to face singing auditions and how to find their voices and style. The writer makes referrals to websites and role models in music that will tell readers more on the topic. This in all is a well-researched book and it delivers in its presentation, topic, theme and its positive effect on readers.

Adetisola succeeds in reviving the lost glory of music and singing and placing this art form in secured hands of singers who are introduced to the pros and cons of singing.

1001 Singing Success Secrets takes cognizance of its readers’ culture and background and discusses basically music and singing style they can all relate too. It offers the dos and don’ts of stage performance, common myths and facts about music, and even how and where to find inspiration for songwriting during blocks, as well as how to go about recording music, production, mastering, mixing and editing.

Adetisola gives it all here, and I bet the reader who wants to make good music will have no business looking outside of this book. This book isn’t only for singers and artistes alone, it can be a good text for readers curious about the world of music and of popular culture.

It even discusses issues about copyrights and royalties and how to not infringe them, which affects, I believe everyone, especially the former. Don’t fear that since this is a musical book there would be lots and lots of jargons and verbosity as well as technical words. The writer does well to use these sorts of words at the barest and allows all classes of readers— beginners, inexperienced, professionals, to relate to the book.

Suffice to say this book will develop all sorts of readers interested in singing and music. It, however, does little or nothing about teaching readers on how to use their voices, follow notes and understanding musical cords, which of course are necessary in learning music.

I must recommend Adetisola for this all-encompassing, comprehensive and insightful book on music and singing.

He did his research so well that virtually every line and the page has something new for the reader to ruminate on. I will recommend this book people trying to start a career in music, choristers, music engineers, promoters and producers, even music managers.

This in all is a singing bible, and like Panam Percy Paul in the forward, I am tempted to say, after going through this book, I doubt much there would be any need for another book on singing and music.

Adetisola did his assignment so well that I can barely see the holes that another book would dare to cover.

Author: Eugene Yakubu

Eugene Yakubu is a book critic, reviewer and storyteller. He loves art and nature; and spends his time reading beautiful novels and writing stories. He reviews Nigerian books for Authorpedia.

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