FRUITLESS

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www.facebook.com/WRRPoetry [Childless]
Will this wait ever end?
Will the time ever come?
Oh my womb!
When will something sprout?

Husband calls me a slut
“You had too many abortions”
Me! But I knew no man
Until I became a bride

Mother-in-law mocks
I bear scar from her lip-whip
Even my mother says I have a husband
In the realm of the spirits

I have been whipped with brooms
Chained under the sun in shrines
How many river baths have I taken?
Elusive remains the deliverance

When will this wait end?
My younger sister’s children
Are becoming ladies
Yet my soil would let no seed sprout

When will this child come?
Is it until my soil is no more moist
And my hands are too weak
To hold the weight a child?

Written by: Oguntoyinbo Motunrayo Favour
Edited by: Kukogho Iruesiri Samson

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3 comments

  1. Emmanuel Dairo – Lagos – But the more I try the more I come to realise that totally knowing oneself is an exercise in futility. Indeed there are things I know; things I don't know; things I don't want to know. But these I know and can tell: that I absolutely rate myself lower than you all do; that I am much given to mirth and melancholy; that I am always on the lookout for avenues to engage in mental philanttropy; that I have fought several battles on the sand of soul - and lost some; that I am in love with kindred genius, or originality, or emulation - like you; and that I believe in my generation - you and yours. Whatever I haven't told you is either trivial or else may be deciphered from the tenor of my talk.
    Emmanuel Dairo says:

    Tunra. Remember me?

    The emotional and psychological trauma of Mama Ailomo, as she goes from pillar to post — or rather, from dibia to Deeper Life — in search of an offspring, is highlighted here.

  2. Emmanuel Dairo – Lagos – But the more I try the more I come to realise that totally knowing oneself is an exercise in futility. Indeed there are things I know; things I don't know; things I don't want to know. But these I know and can tell: that I absolutely rate myself lower than you all do; that I am much given to mirth and melancholy; that I am always on the lookout for avenues to engage in mental philanttropy; that I have fought several battles on the sand of soul - and lost some; that I am in love with kindred genius, or originality, or emulation - like you; and that I believe in my generation - you and yours. Whatever I haven't told you is either trivial or else may be deciphered from the tenor of my talk.
    Emmanuel Dairo says:

    Tunra. Remember me?

    The emotional and psychological
    trauma of Mama Ailomo, as she
    goes from pillar to post — or
    rather, from dibia to Deeper Life
    — in search of an offspring, is
    highlighted here.

    1. Kukogho Iruesiri Samson – Abuja, Nigeria – I am a media professional with experience in multimedia journalism, book publishing, content creation, web management, public relations, media relations, social media management, and client relationship management. My interests include multi-platform content creation and management, media relations, digital and print publishing, and youth-oriented social services. I am open to middle-level positions in organizations that encourage innovation.
      Kukogho Iruesiri Samson says:

      LMAO….Mama Ailomo, who uses that name? On a more serious note, its a terrible ordeal for a real African woman.

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