A POET’S PAST MUST ADRESS HIS PRESENT (an essay by Oludipe Oyin Samuel)

One finds a poet who sounds less like his environment or the rest of his remaining works. One finds a horde of clannish poets who have resumed trapping their styles in the net of the other. One finds a literary community that has forgotten to produce the spirit-immersed poetry, the kind that broadly establishes the contaminant emotive will; not the kind that breeds a hive of self-importance—tributes and odes to self—that which undermines the vicarious role of pathos.

THE LENIENT POEM AND SUBTLE MEANING (an analysis by Oludipe Oyin Samuel)

A Big Airplane Crashed Into the Earth. I read Soyinka’s first collection of prison poems sometime in 2009. Categorically, I need not ‘push dumbfoundment to beg simplification; I hate a wasted talk—I am African’.That professor, I thought his poetry came off as jagged as his hair. But I too was, in admiration and near-fanaticism, curious—… Continue reading THE LENIENT POEM AND SUBTLE MEANING (an analysis by Oludipe Oyin Samuel)

THE THING WITH INTERPRETERS (an essay by Oludipe Oyin Samuel)

Many things are allowed in the ‘most contemporary’ Nigerian literature, even psycho-imaginative meningioma; proclaim the very art of purposeful nationalist writing— countryside lyricals, activist poems from the contained ghetto-minds— I say the dynamics are vastly enmeshed in the spurring notes of sincere satire and a so self-indicting, predictable sadness, that which oft never redeems the… Continue reading THE THING WITH INTERPRETERS (an essay by Oludipe Oyin Samuel)